Day 28

Day 28

It should have been the final chapter. Really. But not quite. It’s a few more days only including our second long weekend of the Lockdown. So not only have we been in Lockdown we’ve had two precious long weekends in the year taken from us although Easter was actually ok for me. First world problems really!

It was a very busy day at work and I’ve done something to my Iliotibial band which has slowed up my walking. People tell me that I need to get a golf ball into it and roll over it!

It’s felt like routine hard day of work today, without any real break. One thing I like about the work at home is when I have a break I can just lie on the couch – or bed, don’t tell anyone – catch up on the news, relax, then back at it. It’s one of the things you don’t have at work. Well I don’t although in days gone by I’ve been to offices where people have couches. Mostly before a financial crisis!

So as we get ready to come out of Lockdown, what happens? For knowledge workers, not much as far as work goes, although you can visit clients in certain circumstances. Speaking of first world problems you can have a cleaner again – but get out of the house while they do their business – you can buy takeaways and takeaway coffee, and take a car for a test drive, contactless (with the salesperson I assume).

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After two or three weeks we’ll be out of Level 3 and most people can get back to normal working. I’ve been thinking about what it is that I will capture and hold going back to normal life.  Not working in the evenings or weekends combined with more structure during the days – I’ve discovered these two things are strongly related. Staying in touch with more people – geography has had less meaning and we talk on video all the time now. Has the age of the video phone finally arrived after 20 years of false starts?

We had another COVID-19 related death today from the Christchurch Resthome making for a total of 14. There’s now 2 people only in ICU and 401 active cases. Globally these are very low numbers and really, we can say that the pandemic has not arrived, didn’t arrive, and we desperately need to start focussing on economic and social recovery.

One of my three readers told me today that he was impressed that every day I get up with a new blog. I’m worried about the remaining days. I wonder if I’ve run out of steam. Can I come up with something for five more days!

Four weeks, we did it, it felt like a long way off on 25 March, but we got there. For some people the economics have been enormously challenging: jobs lost, prospects derailed, plans upset, businesses shuttered and the entire international tourism sector gone.

We can recover. I’ve lived through quite a few big crises – the average person didn’t know the crisis was upon us until it was well underway. For many people, especially pre-Kiwisaver, the stock market was a remote and distant construct. But this time the pace of movement into crisis has been virtually overnight. We even know the night – 25 March 2020. Which is a great start to get moving and rebuild.

I’m quite optimistic that we’re move quickly into recovery and rebuild. I admit to even being a little excited about it all. I’ll do my bit where I can. The next chapter.

Stephen

 

Day 24

Day 24

Writing the titles for this series of blogs has been pretty straightforward, obviously.  Writing it today I had a sense of it coming to an end soon. Slightly melancholic feeling, which is weird after wishing the time away.

The Lockdown will probably end to be replaced by another form of restriction, but the Lockdown blogs will end with Level 4 ends. OK!

The sharemarket – as if its a being – appears optimistic about the current economic prospects. Shares have largely rebounded strongly, not regaining all the gains of the last few years, but quite a bit of it. Investors are seeing signs that COVID-19 as a medical issue is largely dispatched, and the economy can fire up again. Yes it’s more complex on both fronts, but I think that’s the perception.

The government led us strongly into economic freeze to stop the ‘rona spreading. It will say there’s still lots to be done, but by the look of the amount of traffic on the streets today, many people have stopped listening. Business is coming back ready or not I think.

I went on a walk again today, a long walk, Maungakiekie and Cornwall Park, Te Kopuku/Mt St John and Maungawhau/Mt Eden. The body needed a big workout to match the mental energy this past week and it paid off.

Do watch Unorthodox on Netflix which I finished tonight. If you don’t need to wipe your eyes you might be a sociopath! It’s only four episodes.

Although there’s quite a few things I like about the Lockdown, I do miss the weekend drive, the coffee in the cafe and riding my motorbike.

So the challenge is to hold on to new ways whilst grabbing back the best of the past.

Leaders can make this their mantra in the refreshed world in a week or two.

Stephen

Not going to plan

I thought it was the overworked muscles from the gym workout. On Tuesday I hobbled a bit, Wednesday was much better and by the time we started Module two of the Authentic Leadership Programme on Thursday the pain had gone from the legs. But it had moved. Something didn’t feel right though. But I had to keep going – stepping in, in fact – as my co-facilitator was rapidly going downhill with a virus!

By the time I got to the Doctor after the first day it was obvious that neither of us were going to make day 2.

So what to do? What will the participants think about this? And the client? What about all the plans and bookings for the next day?

iStock-639359406.jpgDoing experiential leadership development requires context. We use locations, draw on our and the participants’ experiences, and let it flow.

As in all leadership, sometimes it doesn’t go to plan and you need to be ready to move on. Fast. And make the most of what follows.

We’ll find out in a week  whether a new location and different exercises will work.

I’m pretty sure it will, especially if we don’t try too hard and be open to what flows.

Stephen

 

 

Struggles with change

Man character need help. Vector flat cartoon illustration

It’s trite to say that there’s a lot of change right now. I’ve told myself to stop reading Trump news but I can’t. It’s seems every day brings more deconstruction, as Stephen Bannon calls it, of a democratic government. He seems to be quite reclusive, probably an introvert and if you read what he has to say about the state of the Western World he’s very hostile to immigrants, trade agreements, non-Christians, non-whites, the LGBTQ community. Anyone unlike him.

According to Wikipedia “Bannon was a founding member of the board of Breitbart News, an online far-right news, opinion and commentary website which, according to Philip Elliott and Zeke J. Miller of Time, has “pushed racist, sexist, xenophobic and anti-Semitic material into the vein of the alternative right“.

I’ve been wondering how a person ends up that. You might also wonder how he ended up as the right hand person to the US President. But that’s not what this is about.

Fear. Bannon is scared. Living through all that change and feeling forced to accept progress and equality when you believe they are poisonous. So now it’s revenge and trying to change the world to stop being scared.

And you thought that Trump feeding his insatiable ego was bad enough.

Ironic Satirical Illustration of a Retro Classic Comics Woman Being a Drama Queen

Change can be scary and leaders should be ready to understand, confront and allay fears. Especially now.

Stephen