Adding Value

Adding Value

It’s a common consultant’s pitch – adding value – and a relevant question to ask when engaging one. Last week our Auckland team moved into our new premises in Commercial Bay to impressive, collaborative and inviting premises. We’re confident that it will add value to our culture through ways of working and ultimately help us to better help our clients solve their and society’s, important problems – our Purpose.

Which at first blush sounds almost as grand as the PwC Tower – at 39 levels in a prime location on Auckland’s waterfront – it’s physically imposing and very modern.

Underpinning PwC’s Purpose is WARM Care – Working together, Act with Integrity, Reimagine the possible, Make a difference and Care – our Values.

I’ve found myself reflecting on our values lately as they’ve come up in a number of conversations, as they should. I’ve noticed people starting out on their leadership journeys will often seek examples of straightforward conduct that is either evidence, or not evidence of a particular value. This is the basics.

As we move through our leadership journey, great leaders recognise that values, like new ways of working, are embedded into an organisation’s lifeblood in everything it does. Every action, inaction, interaction, communication, internal dealing, work with clients, will have values embedded in them.

As you are transported up the PwC Tower in the glass-sided elevator at 8 metres a second, looking out over the city it’s easy to forget you’re at a workplace. For a few seconds, it’s another world, quite removed. Suspended.

For leaders, there’s no suspending, opting out, and no action that “skirts” around an organisation’s values. Values are not “things” to reference or use only when needed. They’re everything.

So, it might seem obvious, but if something is not done in accordance with the values, even if it seems benign, it’s contrary to those values.

Next time someone tries to argue that the action or inaction was not against a particular value, ask “So which part of the values was this action facilitating?”

Stephen

I know it’s been a long time between blogs. Unbelievably nearly 3 months – time has flown by! I stopped when our Lockdown finished and as I write now, another lockdown starts in Melbourne. Feel sad for the citizens there. That’s really tough.

Since the lockdown it’s been work as always, partly at home, partly in the office, but no let up. I’ve carried on walking, albeit a bit less as my sore leg has needed some attention. Moving into the new office last week has brought a new energy to work at a range of levels, with the benefits to play out over many years.

Nearly over

Nearly over

I had a sense of slight disappointment when someone texted me to say that most of our restrictions were about to end. I was doing something very mundane – collecting my car from servicing – which almost felt normal although the “service” manager certainly kept his distance.

I’m watching the film Vicky Cristina Barcelona which at its heart is like many other Woody Allen films – about being yourself – at a level of authenticity beyond which we typically engage with in leadership.

Lockdown has been a real gift for me I feel. Firstly, to engage in structure – I’ve talked of that before – but also in deep thought on what matters. At a basic level we didn’t have a chance to have any new “things” for several weeks. Did we feel any loss for that? I doubt it. Did we actually enjoy and embrace more of what we have? I think so. Which might not bode well for the local economy if we realise we don’t need so many new things. Or even takeaway coffee. The $65 home machine is just fine! 

We’ll kinda go back to work if we want to next week, but we don’t have to – we can work at home still – and I suspect many of us will. Some will say they’re being cautious about the ‘rona, but I reckon some of us will stay at home because we like it more. In seven short weeks we’ve actually embraced, enjoyed and thrived in it. I think at a deeper level of personal growth about my own purpose I’ve thrived. I’ve also got far more from my work than the everyday normality – which for me is never too routine – but this was another level.

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There’s a scene in Vicky Cristina Barcelona where Vicky is out to dinner in Barcelona with her fiancé and another couple. The other three are in excited conversation about A/V systems, the latest high-def television, interior designers et al, for their new homes. Vicky gazes in the distance, dreaming of the meaningful life she could – should –  have in Barcelona, in art, with a man she’s passionate about, living life to its full richness.

It’s easy to get caught up in what appears to matter but if I take anything out of the reflections I’ve had in Lockdown it’s to never forget what really matters. They’re not just “to dos”. They’re everything. And only you can work that fundamental purpose question.

Barcelona still beckons.

Stephen